1. 1 day ago  /  24,819 notes  /  Source: sandandglass

  2. photo

    photo

    1 day ago  /  186 notes  /  Source: larvalhex

  3. (via magikarp-irl)

    4 days ago  /  581,774 notes  /  Source: soundslikenovocaineee

  4. 4 days ago  /  465,464 notes

  5. earthlynation:

aDSC_6052 (by mousedeers88)

    earthlynation:

    aDSC_6052 (by mousedeers88)

    (via earthlynation)

    1 week ago  /  291 notes  /  Source: flickr.com

  6. photo

    photo

    photo

    1 month ago  /  893 notes  /  Source: montereybayaquarium

  7. wapiti3:

Veiled Stinkhorn - Phallus indusiatus on Flickr.
Tom Murray (Guyana Fungi)

    wapiti3:

    Veiled Stinkhorn - Phallus indusiatus on Flickr.

    Tom Murray (Guyana Fungi)

    (via mycology)

    1 month ago  /  297 notes  /  Source: wapiti3

  8. malformalady:

Native to Australia, the finger lime(Citrus australasica) is a rare rainforest tree from the Australian east coast. The finger lime holds globular juice vesicles which have been likened to a “lime caviar “, which can be used as a garnish or added to various recipes. The fresh vesicles have the effect of a burst of effervescent tangy flavour as they are chewed. The fruit juice is acidic and similar to that of a lime.

    malformalady:

    Native to Australia, the finger lime(Citrus australasica) is a rare rainforest tree from the Australian east coast. The finger lime holds globular juice vesicles which have been likened to a “lime caviar “, which can be used as a garnish or added to various recipes. The fresh vesicles have the effect of a burst of effervescent tangy flavour as they are chewed. The fruit juice is acidic and similar to that of a lime.

    (via thenomadsway)

    1 month ago  /  32,136 notes  /  Source: malformalady

  9. rhamphotheca:

Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata) 
… are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum). 
Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber. 
They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested. 
Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

    rhamphotheca:

    Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata)

    … are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum).

    Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber.

    They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested.

    Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.

    photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr

    (via: Peterson Field Guides)

    1 month ago  /  511 notes  /  Source: rhamphotheca